Mobile banking has changed the way we manage our money for good, and is saving us billions in bank charges, tech start-ups say.

Charlie Kingston, a 22-year-old software engineer based in London, banks with mobile-only newcomer Starling Bank.

"I joined a mobile bank to get more control over my money," he says. "The in-app 'pulse' gives me a quick and insightful overview about how I'm spending and the real-time alert really helps me to keep on top of things."

International money transfer service Azimo says Europeans could be saving up to £7bn a year in financial fees because mobile banking apps are helping them switch money more quickly and avoid overdraft charges.

Two-fifths of UK consumers say they have avoided up to £100 in debt or charges by using tech to manage their money.

Instant access to balances is also helping us keep an eye on our spending, says Azimo, which interviewed 4,000 people across France, Germany, Spain and the UK.

Carl Riordan, 36, another Starling Bank customer, says he didn't realise how easy it would be. "When I first thought about a bank without branches, I didn't realise it would only take a few taps," he says.

Global banking giant HSBC says that more than 90% of its interactions with customers are now through its digital channels.

That's why more than 1,000 local branches in the UK have closed down in the past two years with 400 more expected in 2017.

Of course, mobile banking is nothing new in Africa, with a service like M-Pesa recently celebrating its 10th anniversary. The mobile payments service launched by Vodafone Safaricom in 2007 now has about 25 million users in 10 countries.

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BBC